Seekers Class – Anglican Essentials

Class #3

The Book of Common Prayer

1. Worship

Worship defines the church. It is our encounter with God along with others. A church is a community of believers giving thanks to God and seeking His grace through fellowship.1. Worship- Worship defines the church. It is our encounter with God along with others. A church is a community of believers giving thanks to God and seeking His grace through fellowship.

Liturgy means “public.” Liturgy is public works done at private expense.

2. Anglican Prayer Book

The first books were written by Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury under Henry VIII and Edward VI.

1548 Order of Communion- An English insert to the Latin Mass.

1549 Prayer Book- The entire liturgy was in English and was the one liturgy for everyone.

1552 Prayer Book- Cranmer’s intended book. He put his ideas of reception of the elements as the high point in the eucharist.

1559 Prayer Book- Under Elizabeth, this one brought back the words of consecration but reception was still big.

Under James VI, Puritan demands for a new book were thrown out at Hampton. Meanwhile, the Scottish Book of 1637 was presented as very Catholic. In England, Civil War made the Prayer Book null and void. “Wee Bookies” were being used.

3. American Prayer Book

We’ve had four books- 1789, 1892, 1928, and 1979.

1789- The 1662 English Book with the Scottish Rite. Services were Word-Centered with Morning Prayer, The Great Litany, and Anti-Communion at the heart of the service.

1892- Added Canticles and gave the clergy a bit more flexibility. Also, the services could be separated.

1928- Mostly doctrinal changes. The main two were propers for a requiem mass and prayers for the dead.

1979-The main change was putting the eucharist at the heart of the service. The eucharist is now the principal act of worship on Sunday, the Lord’s day.